Camp Mokulē‘ia

  • Mokule'ia Writers Retreat
  • Mokule'ia Writers Retreat
  • Mokule'ia Writers Retreat
  • Mokule'ia Writers Retreat
  • Mokuleia Writers Retreat

In the Hawaiian language, Mokulē‘ia means “a place of abundance.” It is also the name of a pristine beach that stretches along the northwest shore of the island of O’ahu, about 45 minutes away from Honolulu. It is located on secluded Kaiahulu Bay, where honu (sea turtles) and the occasional monk seal swim.

Camp Mokulē‘ia was established by The Episcopal Church of Hawaii in 1947, when the original 2.5-acre site was purchased from the McInerny family. Two of the original buildings, erected in the 1920s, still stand (the two-story studio and maintenance shop). Together with leased land to the west, and an additional donated 10 acres across the highway, now a sustainable farm, the camp now comprises 40 acres.

Under the leadership of executive director David Turner, the camp has been undergoing a renewal, with a refurbishing of the lodge, a new gray-water cachement program, and an organic garden. Turner has also overseen the creation of a new mural in the “chapel,” led by Native Hawaiian artist Meleanna Aluli Meyer. The camp hosts a number of camps and retreats throughout the year.

Camp Mokulē‘ia’s mission states that it shall be a sacred place (wahi pana) for reflection, gathering, and play. In addition to nurturing mind, body, and spirit, Camp Mokulē‘ia is dedicated to being a rich resource for artists, at the lowest possible cost.

For more on the history, as well as the new developments at Camp Mokulē‘ia, see this page. For a sense of the beauty of the location, please noodle around the camp’s Web site and make sure to see the slideshow under Our Setting.

Mokule`ia Writers Retreat, May 3–8, 2015